End of an Era

Rene, Philip, Ragnar and I celebrating a Goldfinch!

Rene, Philip, Ragnar and I celebrating a Goldfinch!

Windy, almost stormy, rain, lack of light. Winter is coming. The last few days have been almost non-birdable. It is almost time to go into birding hibernation until march. Strong westerly winds have hit the islands and the few classic late eastern vagrants seem like a far-fetched dream currently.

Just when the Sibirean Accentors had made their way to Orkney, Shetland and Western Norway the winds changed. ‘Cause birds really do need some good tail winds to get out here – Shetland is only half the distance from Norway. But who knows. Maybe a bird or two have mad landfall just to show up in my garden later, when I decide to take a peek out the window?

But there are still birds around. Two days ago the Western Bonelli’s Warbler was still present and Ragnar managed to find a Goldfinch in Árnafirði a few days ago while another Goldfinch was in Viðareiði two days ago.

Goldfinch

Goldfinch

There are also still plenty of Chiffchaffs and Blackcaps – and Redpolls and Waxwings are around in really good numbers.

Redpoll in Klaksvík

Redpoll in Klaksvík

 

Redpoll in Klaksvík - could go as a Cous' Arctic in Denmark but not on the Faroes due to the Icelandic nightmare-complex of Redpolls

Redpoll in Klaksvík – could probably pass as a Coues’s Arctic in Denmark but not on the Faroes due to the Icelandic nightmare-complex of Redpolls

 

Mealy Redpoll in Hvalvík

Mealy Redpoll in Hvalvík

Yesterday a Little Egret was present Millum Fjarða. Always quite exotic here!

little-egret-d1

 

But I seriously doubt than we will have any more large arrivals of eastern migrants this autumn. And of course lack of birds means lack of effort and lack of effort means less birds and so on.

Waxwing

Waxwing

Winter is here. I’ve even caught my self watching gulls and ducks during the last few days. Winter is here. Two days ago Rodmund even went to Sandoy, where he found a male American Wigeon (probably returning bird) and a likely Coues’s Arctic Redpoll. Sure it is winter.

But this is birding and this is the Faroes. Maybe there is still a Blyth’s Pipit, a Siberian Accentor, Brown Shrike or a Pine Bunting out there to be found? Something has to be out there, but if it will be found is another question. Most likely not. But well, gulls and ducks are interesting too. And frankly this autumn has probably been the best autumn ever on the Faroes when it comes to numbers and the amount of rarities found! At least more than enough great birds to keep the mood going during the dark months ahead.

Silas

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One comment on “End of an Era

  1. All good things to those who wait.

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